COST CALCULATOR

How Much Does A Concrete Slab Cost?

Typical range: $2,266-$2,741

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How much does concrete cost?

For your project in zip code 20149 with these options, the concrete slab cost starts at $7.55-$9.14 per square foot. Your actual price will depend on job size, conditions, finish options you choose.

A concrete slab is versatile and durable that can be used in a wide variety of applications, including driveways and patios. The average cost of a concrete slab is $8.21 per square foot for materials and installation. Based on this average cost, a 10x10 concrete slab will cost $821, a 20x20 concrete slab will cost $3,284, and a 30x30 concrete slab will cost $7,398.

The cost of a concrete slab depends on many factors, including size, thickness, reinforcement, base, and finish.

Cost Calculator
Calculations are dependent on where you live
Square Feet

Standard ServicesQuantityLowHigh
What you can expect
Range per square foot:$7.55$9.14
Range for this type of project:$2,266$2,741
Estimate: $2,504
Concrete Slab Installation Cost
321
square feet
$535$613
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Cost of 4+"-thick, fibermesh-reinforced concrete with 3500 PSI, and a practical, attractive broom finish. Rate is inclusive of local delivery, as well as standard excess for perfect installation and occasional future touch-ups.
Basic Labor for Concrete Slab Installation
24
hours
$1,575$1,909
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Standard labor cost for cement slab installation, from a full site assessment to preparation, installation, and cleanup. Height and slope will be assessed to plan layout, and loose soil will be lightly graded and removed. Form will be set and reinforced, then concrete will be poured and finished. Specialty services, such as excavation, gravel base layer, compaction, or hardscape demolition will incur additional costs.
Job Supplies for Concrete Slab Installation
321
square feet
$69$78
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Supplies to ensure outstanding installation include reinforcing materials and additives, isolation materials, and agents for chemical release and cleaning.
Equipment Allowance for Concrete Slab Installation
1
job
$88$141
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Equipment allowance for perimeter form boards and stakes, 48" bull float, reinforcing bar cutters, and mixing box with mortar hoe. This is assessed as a daily rental fee, while single-use equipment will incur separate charges.
Optional Services
Slab Excavation Labor (Optional)
6
hours
$387$469
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Professional excavation with hand tools, to a uniform depth up to 8" below surface level. This service is offered for sidewalks, slabs, and driveways. Excavated material will be distributed on-site.
Standard services
Concrete Slab Installation Cost
$535 -$613
arrow_drop_down
321
square feet
Cost of 4+"-thick, fibermesh-reinforced concrete with 3500 PSI, and a practical, attractive broom finish. Rate is inclusive of local delivery, as well as standard excess for perfect installation and occasional future touch-ups.
Basic Labor for Concrete Slab Installation
$1,575 -$1,909
arrow_drop_down
24
hours
Standard labor cost for cement slab installation, from a full site assessment to preparation, installation, and cleanup. Height and slope will be assessed to plan layout, and loose soil will be lightly graded and removed. Form will be set and reinforced, then concrete will be poured and finished. Specialty services, such as excavation, gravel base layer, compaction, or hardscape demolition will incur additional costs.
Job Supplies for Concrete Slab Installation
$69 -$78
arrow_drop_down
321
square feet
Supplies to ensure outstanding installation include reinforcing materials and additives, isolation materials, and agents for chemical release and cleaning.
Equipment Allowance for Concrete Slab Installation
$88 -$141
arrow_drop_down
1
job
Equipment allowance for perimeter form boards and stakes, 48" bull float, reinforcing bar cutters, and mixing box with mortar hoe. This is assessed as a daily rental fee, while single-use equipment will incur separate charges.
Optional Services
Slab Excavation Labor (Optional)
$387 -$469
arrow_drop_down
6
hours
Professional excavation with hand tools, to a uniform depth up to 8" below surface level. This service is offered for sidewalks, slabs, and driveways. Excavated material will be distributed on-site.
What you can expect
Range per square foot:
$8 - $9
Range for this type of project:
$2,266 - $2,741
Estimate:
$2,504
Cost Comparison
YOUR ESTIMATE
$2,504

NATIONAL AVERAGE RANGE
$2,229 -$2,697
YOUR ESTIMATE

Concrete slab: national average cost

The national average materials concrete slab cost is $1.76 per square foot, with a range between $1.64 to $1.88. The total price for labor and materials per square foot is $8.21, coming in between $7.43 to $8.99. A typical 300 square foot project costs $2,463.42, with a range of $2,229.50 to $2,697.34. Your actual price will depend on your location, job size, conditions and finish options you choose.
concrete slab cost
National Avg. Materials Cost per square foot$1.76
National Avg. Cost (labor and materials) for 300 square foot$2,463.42
National Cost Range (labor and materials) for 300 square foot$2,229.50 - $2,697.34

Concrete cost per square foot

Concrete slabs can be poured in almost any size and shape. That said, there are some standard concrete slab sizes you can use for general reference when considering costs. Refer to the calculator for specific details about your project.

The national average ranges to pour common concrete slab sizes:

Slab Size Square Footage Average Cost Cost Range
8x10 80 $657 $594 - $719
10x10 100 $821 $743 - $899
10x20 200 $1,642 $1,486 - $1,789
12x12 144 $1,182 $1,070 - $1,294
20x20 400 $3,284 $2,972 - $3,596
24x24 576 $4,728 $4,279 - $5,178
24x30 720 $5,911 $5,349 - $6,472
30x30 900 $7,389 $6,687 - $8,091

Cost of concrete per yard

Most concrete project prices and planning use square footage. There are three feet in a yard, so divide your feet by three to get the yard measurement of your project. Concrete costs an average of $73.89 per square yard, because this is nine times bigger than a square foot.

Other cost factors

Aside from size and square footage, other factors that affect the cost per square foot for your concrete slab include

  • Reinforcement, which ensures strength and durability, especially for foundations.
  • Site preparation, making sure the ground underneath your concrete slab is even.
  • Labor, both your concrete professional's expertise level and the local labor market.
  • Removal of your old concrete if needed.
  • Thickness of the concrete slab you want.
  • Finish options, including sealant and decorations.

Reinforcement

Reinforcement is important for foundations to build a solid structure. Not all concrete projects need reinforcement, but it is likely required if it needs to bear a lot of weight. For shed and home foundations, reinforcement is a good idea.

There are a few different options for concrete reinforcement. Expect to pay more per square foot for concrete reinforcement on top of other project costs.

Solution Uses
Augment the concrete mixture with sand and other amendments
  • Adjustable for different applications
  • Strengthens concrete for more durability
  • Special additives can be used to prevent cracks in cold weather
  • Additives can prevent moisture loss and weakening over time
Adding steel rebar
  • Some local zoning codes will require rebar for certain applications. Check with your local planning office
Steel mesh
  • Cheaper than rebar and more flexible for smaller areas and in residential projects
Reinforcing the edges
  • Increases the thickness of your concrete slab at the edges to prevent cracks

Site preparation and base

Depending on the location, you may need to level the ground and do other preparations. Ask if your land needs clearing or grading before pouring your concrete slab.

Before pouring a concrete slab, you also need to lay a base material between the ground and the concrete. This helps to prevent cracking, settlement and helps with drainage. The base material is usually made of gravel or sand depending on where you live. It is often included in your project bid but confirm with your professional before moving forward.

Labor

Labor costs will vary, but expect to pay an average of $6.45 per square foot for labor costs. If the contractor runs into any issues or exceeds the allotted time, you may also have to pay for extra labor.

Labor may cost more if you hire a seasoned pro or if the concrete market in your area is competitive. We recommend getting at least three project bids to ensure you’re not overpaying for labor.

Removal

If you need to have old concrete removed, this will also add to your total costs. The average cost of concrete removal is $8 to $10 per square foot.

Removing old concrete can also add to the length of your project. Ask for an estimate from your contractor to understand what to expect from the timeline.

Thickness

Different concrete slab thicknesses are used for different purposes. In general, expect to pay for a 4 - 6 inch thick concrete slab for most residential projects. You may be able to order up to 8 inches thick if the concrete will need to hold heavy weight, or as slim as 2 inches.

Thicker concrete will cost you more and take more time to pour, so choose wisely when planning your project.

Concrete Slab Use Recommended Thickness
Driveway 4 inches (for standard cars)
6 inches (for RVs)
Patio 4 inches
Garage pad 6 inches
Shed 4 inches

Complex and uniquely shaped areas will also need more preparation before pouring concrete, which can also cost more.

Finish

One of the disadvantages of concrete is that it isn’t very attractive. There are many finish options to customize and beautify your concrete slab. Most finishes will be about $4 - $8 per square foot in added cost, but high-end stamping can cost you quite a bit more. Be sure to ask for a quote as you plan your finish and sealant.

Finish Type Best Used For
Troweled finish For a smooth finish without any grip
Broom finish Creates rough textured concrete for traction control and slip-resistance
Stamped concrete Creates a patterned finish in concrete for aesthetics and traction control
Salt finish Adds a decorative rough texture – good for swimming pools and other wet areas
Exposed aggregate Adds an interesting design element to polished concrete floors
Colored and stained concrete Adds a tint to otherwise plain concrete using pigment or stains. Add this to other finishes or underneath a sealant to protect the tint
Concrete sealer Use sealant on most decorative finishes or for slabs that will outdoors.

Depending on the nature of your project, a layer of concrete sealant will be an extra cost. Typical sealants are penetrating, acrylic, polyurethane, or epoxy. Epoxy and polyurethane tend to provide the thickest, most durable finish.

Cost to pour concrete by project

A helpful way to estimate the cost of your concrete project is by the type of project planned. Below, we’ve included cost estimates for common residential projects. The final cost will depend on your preferences and local market, as well as the sizes of the project.

Concrete driveway

The average cost of a standard 2-car driveway is $5,254. Costs will increase if you opt for sealant or a special finish. Most driveway projects also need concrete removal, so ask your contractor for a quote that includes it.

Concrete patio

A concrete or cement patio can give you a more usable outdoor space. The larger the patio and the more detail you need, the higher the cost will be. Pouring concrete for a patio will cost an average of $2,364. Concrete pool decks may cost more since they need special shapes and features that make them more complex than a simple patio.

Concrete countertop

One of the hottest trends in kitchens is concrete countertops. These unique countertops are durable, modern, and perfect for rustic and industrial-inspired kitchens. The cost of professional concrete countertops averages between $2,100 to $5,250 given the specialized nature of the project.

Concrete foundation

From a new home to a storage shed, concrete foundations are essential to a solid, strong structure. Concrete foundations need reinforcements like rebar (steel), so they cost more than a basic project. A concrete foundation costs an average of $8,132, with most homeowners spending between $3,993 and $12,200 in total.

Types of concrete

You may be surprised to know that there are many different types of concrete to choose from. They vary in strength, durability, heat resistance, and workability.

  • Reinforced concrete includes bars, fiber, or other material to increase its strength. Reinforcement is typical for residential weight-bearing slabs.
  • Lightweight concrete is made from pumice instead of typical stone or rock. It’s not as strong as other types of concrete and is typically used as insulation or protection.
  • High-strength concrete can hold more weight than a regular mix. Your concrete professional can help decide what type is the best fit for the weight your project needs to bear.
  • High-density concrete is further reinforced with iron or other material instead of rock in the mixture. This is for even heavier-duty projects than high-strength concrete and is not typically used in residential projects.
  • Precast concrete isn’t a different mixture but is a different type of delivery. Precast refers to concrete that has already been poured and set into its shape before installation. Precast is a popular option for buildings or standardized projects and tends to be very strong because it’s made in a controlled environment.

Professional vs. DIY concrete slabs

Installing a concrete slab is a complex project. Each step requires specialized tools and knowledge. Any errors during preparation, pouring or finishing can lead to cracking, poor drainage, or a bad finish. For best results, homeowners should consider hiring a professional for this job.

When hiring a professional, be sure to get bids for your concrete project to help you compare prices and save. Your bid should explain the cost of materials, labor, preparation, installation, and finishes.

Yes, you technically can pour your own concrete, but big jobs are best left to professionals. For smaller and more basic projects, here is what you need to know:

  1. Gather your materials. The tools and materials you’ll need include concrete subgrade, subbase, wooden boards, concrete and mixer, vapor barrier, reinforcements, bull float, edger, groover, and a basic push broom.
  2. Remove any existing concrete and prepare the space for slab installation. Lay down and tamp a concrete’s subgrade to provide a stable foundation for the slab.
  3. Add a layer of gravel or other subbase material on top of the concrete’s subgrade. This will also need to be tamped down.
  4. Measure your slab area and install a wooden boundary around the perimeter. Install a vapor barrier, then add any reinforcements, like rebar or wire mesh.
  5. Mix the concrete according to the instructions on the bag using a concrete mixer (or you can mix it manually in a wheelbarrow). When the concrete is fully mixed, pour the concrete, spread it around the wooden perimeter, and level it off. Use a bull float to press down any material that protrudes from the concrete.
  6. Set your edges, then set the joints so they are spaced out at every five or six feet.
  7. Unless you want a smooth surface, add texture with a broom before the concrete sets completely.
  8. Finally, add a concrete sealer.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

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